CFP

CAALS CFPs for AAAS 2019

Please consider submitting a paper proposal for one of our two CAALS-organized panels for AAAS 2019 (April 25–27, 2019, in Madison, WI)! Panel Title: Racial Ambiguity and Racial Passing: Reading the Ungovernable Body in Mixed-Race Asian American Literature Chair: Roberta Wolfson, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo In her book Partly Colored: Asian Americans …

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CFP

CAALS CFP for AAAS 2018

Please consider submitting a proposal for the first CAALS-organized AAAS panel! CFP for AAAS 2018 Panel Title: Re-imagining (the) Work in/of Literature Chair: Mark Chiang, University of Illinois at Chicago The resurgence of populism both in the US and abroad has been fueled by widespread skepticism regarding the capacity of free trade and economic globalization …

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CFP

CAALS CFPs for ALA 2017

This year’s American Literature Association conference is back in Boston. Below are the four 2017 CFPs for the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies (CAALS). Please keep in mind that if your proposal is accepted, you will need to become a member of CAALS in order to present, in addition to joining ALA and registering for the conference. …

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CFP Conferences

CFPs for ALA 2016!

This year’s ALA meeting will be held in San Francisco. Please see their webpage for general conference information. Below are the CFPs for the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies. This post will be updated as needed. Please remember that if your paper is accepted, you will need to register as a member of CAALS …

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CFP Conferences

CALL FOR PAPERS: American Literature Association–May 24-27, 2012

1.) Panel: “Afro-Asian Intersections in the Americas” Joint session between the African American Literature & Culture Society and the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies We are seeking papers examining intersections, influences, and intimacies between African American culture and Asian American culture in any and all genres within American literature—with “American” being understood broadly to …

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