CFPs for ALA 2016!

This year’s ALA meeting will be held in San Francisco. Please see their webpage for general conference information.

Below are the CFPs for the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies. This post will be updated as needed. Please remember that if your paper is accepted, you will need to register as a member of CAALS in order to present. This applies to all panels and roundtables. For any questions about CFPs, please contact individual organizers. Note that different deadlines apply to each CFP.

CFP: #Asians4BlackLives: Protest and Solidarity in Asian American Literature

Chair: Sharon Tang-Quan, Westmont College

Police brutality against people of color has been making daily headlines. In 2012, the Black Lives Matter movement began after George Zimmerman was acquitted for the murder of Trayvon Martin. Using the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter, the movement has protested the deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Eric Harris, Walter Scott, Sandra Bland, Samuel DuBose, and Freddie Gray, and continues to campaign against police brutality and anti-black racism.

Asian American allies have joined this fight. In a November 2014 Time article, “Why Ferguson Should Matter to Asian-Americans,” Jack Linshi discussed the power of Afro-Asian solidarity and pointed to the deaths of Kuanchang Kao (1997), Cau Bich Tran (2003), and Fong Lee (2006) at the hands of police, in which there were no criminal charges and no public campaigns on behalf of the victims. During this past Lunar New Year parade in San Francisco, #Asians4BlackLives handed out red envelopes with the following message: “As Asian Americans, we enjoy many rights that were fought for and won by Black liberation movements. Today, we too have the power to stand on the side of justice. We can create harmony by building strong relationships between Black and Asian communities and standing together for Black Lives. Which side are you on?”

This panel is focused on protest and social justice in Asian American literature, and we seek papers that examine Asian American literature as sites of resistance and cross-racial solidarity. How have Asian American writers used traditional and new modes of protest? In what ways do we see the traces of historical activism and social movements, and how have digital technologies helped to reinvigorate these causes? How are Asian Americans writing in solidarity with allies in order to speak out against racism, while acknowledging the anti-blackness in our communities? To what extent are communities of color being formed, and in what ways have communities of color been divided?

Please email a proposal (250 words maximum) and a brief CV to Sharon Tang-Quan (stangquan@westmont.edu) by January 15, 2016. Please mention any technological needs for your presentation. Please note that if your proposal is accepted and you agree to participate in the roundtable, you will need to become a member of CAALS prior to presenting, in addition to joining ALA and registering for the conference. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

 

CFP: Yellowface: Performing and Occupying the Mind, Body, and Space in Asian American literature

ALA May 26-29, 2016, San Francisco
(http://alaconf.org)

“…My life’s spent / running an inept tour for my own sad swindle of a vacation / until every goddamned thing’s reduced to botched captions / and dabs of misinformation in fractured, / not-quite-right English: …” excerpted from “The Bees, the Flowers, Jesus, Ancient Tigers, Poseidon, Adam and Eve” by Yi-Fen Chou

In the Contributor’s Notes and Comments in The Best American Poetry 2015 guest edited by Sherman Alexie, Michael Derrick Hudson unmasks his nom de plume, stirring outrage, and becomes the reviled face of appropriation. In his admission:

“after a poem of mine has been rejected a multitude of times under my real name, I put Yi-Fen’s name on it and send it out again. As a strategy for ‘placing’ poems this has been quite successful for me. The poem in question, ‘The Bees, the Flowers, Jesus, Ancient Tigers, Poseidon, Adam and Eve,’ was rejected under my real name forth (40) times before I sent it out as Yi-Fen Chou (I keep detailed submission records). As Yi-Fen the poem was rejected nine (9) times before Prairie Schooner took it. If indeed this is one of the best American poems of 2015, it took quite a bit of effort to get it into print, but I’m nothing if not persistent. “

He serves poetry editors a blunt instrument opening inquiry how poems are selected—the poem or the assumed ethnic heritage of author.

If turning Chinese was the key to his success, then it puts in to question how editors treat literary submissions written by authors with Asian-sounding names. Does the scarcity of Asian writers in anthologies such as the highly visible BAP validate a kind of divisive affirmative action?

More problematic is the privilege by which Hudson so easily masks himself in Yellowface for self-promotion. One can read the confession as thumbing his nose at both editors not just in BAP 2015, in Prairie Schooner, but to all journals that assumed they were choosing an Asian writer to diversify their volume. Whereas BAP elicits cynicism, especially in the discussion of what poetry was selected as best of a given year, the 2015 volume elevates to a level of disgust. Immediate calls to boycott the volume, to not purchase it, ignored the fact, this volume is the most multicultural, to ‘ethnic bias.”

The “sad swindle” or subversion is not Hudson’s own. Implicated in this botched anthology are David Lehman, series editor, and Sherman Alexie, guest editor. With much time to reconsider Hudson’s invitation in to the anthology, they still proceeded to keep him in print. The reaction from the Asian American community was quick, unrelenting, and unforgiving. The defense can be read here:
http://blog.bestamericanpoetry.com/…/like-most-every-poet-i…

Whether or not you are impressed by Alexie’s guidelines when selecting the best poems of 2015, when choosing the offender, Alexie was “amenable to the poem because [he] thought the author was Chinese American.”

Despite their intentions, the reception has been negative. Alexie and Lehman have the responsibility to prevent ethnic fraud. But should be poetry so safe guarded against writers wishing to take a personae?

When the real Yi-Fen Chou surfaced, Hudson’s appropriation turned to identity theft.

Even before the release of BAP 2015, the gaffe of the Poetry Foundation producing a list of Asian American writers stirred emotions. The list paired writers with their assumed country of origin as if to negate they can never claim the United States as origin. The following link is a sanitized version of that list, now more expansive, and omitting the countries of origin expected of them to claim, own, and demonstrate cultural affiliation: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/article/247362
Was this a case of Yellowface, too?

Asian in/authenticity led to the Facebook circulation of Cathy Linh Che’s google doc
https://docs.google.com/…/1u364q7ctO8MM90mvJHXxxGeCYX…/edit… insists on a self-reporting and registration of known Asian writers in America.

Further reading is found here:
http://lithub.com/actual-asian-poets/

ImageImagehttp://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/09/when-a-poem-by-a-white-male-author-smells-less-sweet/404134/

http://www.thestranger.com/…/on-sherman-alexies-choice-to-u…

The roundtable will not dwell completely on Hudson’s appropriation because Yellowface in American literature is not new. Yellowface persists in publisher and readership expectation to the extent real Asians exaggerate, highlight, and emphasize Asian-ness for the sake of publication.

The roundtable seeks to address:
Performing the Asian-in affect, homage, and/or parody.
Authenticity/Inauthenticity
Yellowface as a form of Colonization, Occupation, Privilege.
Forms of Registry
-Asian American registration as started and evolved in the Poetry Foundation.
-Hyphenation
-Self-Identification of Asian origin in in author bios.
-Editorial identification of Asian origin in author bios.
-Classification (being Vietnamese)
Legacy
-Authors who have performed/appropriate the Asian
Offense vs. Pride.
Yellowface as subgenre of Asian literature.
Yellowface as subgenre of American literature.
Yellowface as writer technique.
Yellowface as a form of characterization. Do nonAsian writers perform Yellowface when placing Asian characters in their stories? Think Carson McCullers, John Steinbeck, Mona Simpson, William T. Vollman, Vendela Vida–as an example of novelists. There are poets as well.

Yellowface as a form of appropriation, not just of bodies, but of literary forms or translation credit.
Yellowface as a form of erasure, annihilation, fever, fantasy.
Yellowface as a kind of travel literature.
Yellowface as roots.
Yellowface as a critical tool, or impulsive dismissal.
Yellowface as Misrecognition. Misidentification.
Yellowface as Effacement, defacement. Facility. Rape. Identity theft. Hijacking.
Yellowface Exorcism, possession, remediation, sanction,
Yellowface as Persistence, encouragement, anxiety, ambivalence, white frailty.
The roundtable invites scholars actively writing and performing literature to bring in to discussion and context approaches by which to address Yellowface for in the classroom as in teaching how to recognize or evaluate when writers perform Yellowface, in the editorial process, in performance whether for an audience or to a hiring committee as in affecting an appeal to ethnic advantage or uniqueness, and in evaluating Asian-ness as in authentic enough to speak on behalf of lived or community experience.
Submit 250 to 500-word abstracts and a CV, by January 15, 2016, to Sean Labrador y Manzano at seanlabradorymanzano@gmail.com.

 

CFP: Strained Utterance: Mixed Race Asian Avant Garde

ALA May 26-29, 2016, San Francisco
(http://alaconf.org)

When Ron Loewinsohn writes,

I’ve put out the cigarette, the smoke / I’ve taken into my lungs & out / again: The ways I’ve seen you, & hold / them now, those ways, sliding / like a ship into the sea. This / is what I’m afraid of, that sea, / that home that doesn’t interest me. // One morning, after everyone had passed out, / Basil & I sat up talking about / the bombs, his London, my Manila, some flat / on Buchanan Street, the sun outside / for both of us. I passed him the bottle. // It’s in those moments between / the passing of the jug that I think / of this, this place, what / is this, here, & what have I to do with it? / If not for you, what, in hell, / do I have to do?
(excerpted from “It Is to Be Bathed in Light” The World of the Lie (1963)

he reveals a sense of place, a point of origin, not identified in much of his poetry. Prose produced in retirement shares life in the Philippines before World War 2 and transit to the United States. How he is unnoticed by the Philippine American literary community is astonishing though not surprising as he rarely if not at all announced his ethnicity to his students while a professor in the English Department as UC Berkeley.

The panel on Mixed-Race Asian Avant Garde poets seeks to explore how being mixed-race shapes (or unshape, or not shape) content, structure, poetic technique, language, readability, unreadability, instruction, identity, power relations, forms of knowledge, expected grievance, careers, publishing histories, privacy, or notoriety, and more. We seek how being mixed-race bridges experimental poetics with studies in the Asian experience in American. Is there more or less agency, subjectivity, privilege, deracination, stereotyping, othering, pressure to assimilate, or inaccessibility to collective ethnic histories? How are the poetries a reflection of America’s wars or labor histories through which such mixing takes place on the periphery? Do writers cite parents as soldiers or war brides? How does mixed-race challenge the appreciation or categorization of Asian American. Does the Avant-Garde defuse Identity Politics, becomes a refuge from overt and recycled idioms of “otherness.”

The panel looks forward to any proposals that address the presence, marginalization, and invisibility of Mixed-Raced Asian Americans in the Avant-Garde. Do these poets perform a token function diversifying a predominant white field? Do they mollify the need to discuss race in American poetry?

Some writers to consider include Kasey Mohammed, Ai, Mei-Mei Berssenbrugge, Ronaldo V. Wilson, David Lau, Geneva Chao, Sesshu Foster, Brian Kim Stefans, Ron Loewinsohn, Jai Arun Ravine, Kenny Tanemura, Brynn Saito, Wei Ming Dariotis, Pimone Triplett, Kimiko Hahn, John Yau, Heinz Insu Fenkl, MG Roberts, Jennifer Hayashida, Sadakichi Hartmann, and the list goes on….
Submit 250 to 500-word abstracts, AV requirements, and a CV, by January 15, 2016, to Sean Labrador y Manzano at seanlabradorymanzano@gmail.com.

 

CFP: Critical Perspectives on Karen Tei Yamashita
Sponsored by The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies
Chair: Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, University of Maryland
Due Date: January 25, 2016

In the playground of cultural history, Karen Tei Yamashita is at once the big slide and the children who follow no rules. Her oeuvre moves us irreverently across every imaginable border, horizontal and vertical—Kandice Chuh has characterized Yamashita’s work as “palimpsestic” and “ecological” in its attention to layers, genealogies, and transnational currents. With the publication of the 2010 National Book Award finalist *I Hotel*, which gives us the polyphonic tumult of the 60s and 70s and the rise of the Asian American Movement, critical attention to Yamashita’s work is on the rise.

This panel seeks to highlight new scholarship on Yamashita’s oeuvre; proposals on any of her novels, or on her 2014 fiction/performance collection *Anime Wong* or her 2001 short story/essay collection *Circle K Cycles*, are welcome.

Please email a 250-300 word abstract of your paper to Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis at lawrence.minh.davis@gmail.com by January 25, 2016. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract.

 

CFP: Asian American Literary Studies: 34 Years of Critical History
Sponsored by The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: Lynn Mie Itagaki, The Ohio State University
Due Date: January 15, 2016

We are seeking paper proposals for a panel, “Asian American Literary Studies: 34 Years of Critical History,” sponsored by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies (CAALS) at the Annual Conference of the American Literature Association in San Francisco, CA on May 26-29, 2016. Celebrating Elaine H. Kim’s landmark publication Asian American Literature: An Introduction to the Writings and Their Social Context (1982), this panel proposes to analyze the field of Asian American literary studies that has developed to include and acknowledge a diverse group of literatures under this category. The critical/theoretical development of the field covered both political movements as well as the changing demographics stemming from mass migrations. This panel solicits paper proposals to broadly consider the following questions: How has the trajectory of Asian American critical literary history developed over time? How do Asian Americans and Asian diasporic communities reflect the trajectory of the field? What kinds of dialogues take place between the Asian American literary canon and the broader American literary canon?

The recognition of specific gender, class, and racial differences within the Asian American literary field in a broader sense has spurred heated arguments about identification. We have seen how the “authentic” has worked its way into fiction as well as how that very fiction reflected tensions in the literary community in regards to citizenship and recognition. Specifically, we see tensions in the ways Asian American bodies occupy a liminal space of both belonging and integration as they simultaneously experience rejection and tolerance. Asian diasporic histories grow increasingly complicated and layered; major historical events have continually shaped our conception of the literature and what it even means to have a recognized body of literature. This panel invites considerations of a wide range of Asian American texts such as fiction, poetry, film, journalism, memoir, or activist writing, and encourages intersections with critical ethnic studies, feminist studies, queer studies, disability studies, and environmental studies.

 

Please email a 250-300 word abstract of your paper to Lynn Itagaki at itagaki.5@osu.edu by January 25, 2016. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract.

Announcing the inaugural CAALS Essay Prize

CAALS ESSAY PRIZE
Due Date: May 9, 2014

Starting this year, CAALS will be launching an annual book prize for the best paper on Asian American literary studies written by a graduate student/doctoral candidate (or, should the occasion arise, an undergraduate student) and presented at any ALA panel. Papers must be submitted electronically by May 9, 2014. Papers will be read and evaluated by a committee drawn from the CAALS leadership and membership. The winner will be notified before the ALA and will be the guest of honor at the annual CAALS dinner at the conference. Submissions and inquiries should be sent to caalsweb@gmail.com.

CALL FOR PAPERS: American Literature Association–May 23-26, 2013

CALLS FOR PAPERS for the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies panels at ALA 2013 in Boston! Please consult the ALA website for more information on the conference fees, site, and other logistics. Please note that the required CAALS membership for participation in CAALS panels is separate from the ALA conference fee.

1) Geographies of Asian America

The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies invites submissions for two panels that reflect on the development and state of Asian American literature through the “geographies” of Asian America with an eye to regional differences and the transnational turn.

While the West Coast and Hawaii have long occupied a central place in Asian American literature due to their closeness to the Asia Pacific and the high concentration of Asian Americans in these regions, new sensibilities of Asian American places can also be seen in post-1965 Asian American literature. Gish Jen, Chang-rae Lee, and Jhumpa Lahiri, for example, embed the variegated lives of Asian Americans in urban centers and suburban neighborhoods on the East Coast in their work. Scholarship such as Leslie Bow’s recent book, Partly Colored: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South, uncovers the story of the previously overlooked Asian American South.

Recent emphasis on transnationalism and diaspora in Asian American Studies also prompts us to think of the geographies of Asian America beyond the territorial boundaries of the nation-state. For example, Chang-rae Lee’s A Gesture Life is set in a suburban neighborhood in upstate New York; yet half the novel shows the wartime Pacific in flashbacks. More recent fiction that contain narratives of American-born Asians returning to the country of origin, such as Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake or Aimee Phan’s The Reeducation of Cherry Truong, likewise ask us to reexamine our assumptions of space and place as it pertains to Asian America.

How does Asian American literature create Asian American geographies in the U.S. and abroad? We invite papers on any aspect of the question. Email abstracts of 200-250 words to jeehyun.lim@gmail.com by January 15. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/

2) Humanities Under Attack: Teaching Asian American Literature

We are seeking participants for a roundtable discussion at the Annual Conference of the American Literature Association in Boston from May 23-26, 2013. The roundtable will address teaching Asian American literature in the current environment in which humanities are under attack. The state of Florida has proposed charging students more tuition for humanities majors, classifying them as “non-strategic,” non-productive disciplines. Programs and departments that focus on women, gender, sexuality, and racial groups are the first to experience funding cuts, budgeting freezes, no new hiring, or rejection for their creation; the global financial crisis dramatically reduced already historically low state funding for education and private endowments. How do we teach Asian American literature and studies in a way that matters? How do we make what we do and teach visible to skeptical administrators, university regents, voters, and funding sources? What kind of goals and learning outcomes do we have for our students in Asian American literature classes and how do we revise them in this anti-humanities educational environment? We welcome participants to think theoretically and historically as well as more specifically on their own experiences and conditions at their institutions. The roundtable will feature 7 minutes of remarks by five participants followed by 40 minutes of discussion.

If you are interested in participating in this roundtable, please email a brief 150-200 word description of how your remarks would address the topic of teaching Asian American literature to Lynn Itagaki at itagaki.5@osu.edu by January 15. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

Panels for ALA 2012, San Francisco

(From the draft program.)

Thursday, May 24, 2012, 9:00 – 10:20 am
Session 1-A Afro-Asian Connections I: 20th C. Intersections among African-American and Asian Americans
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies and the African American Literature and Culture Society

Chair: Jennifer Ho, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
1. “Annexation in the Pacific and Asian Conspiracy in Central America in James Weldon Johnson’s Libretti for “Toloso” and “El Presidente, or the Yellow Peril,” John Gruesser, Kean University
2. “Jim and Jap Crow in 1940s Chicago,” Matthew Briones, University of Chicago
3. “A Tale of Two Obits: Reading the Cold War through the Obituaries of W.E.B. DuBois and Chairman Mao Tsetung,” Vera Leigh Fennell, Lehigh University
4. “‘We Didn’t Speak No English, and He Didn’t Speak No Chinese’: Community, Cultural Exchange, and the Afro-Asian South in Cynthia Shearer’s The Celestial Jukebox,” Frank Cha, College of William and Mary

Thursday, May 24, 2012, 12:00 – 1:20 pm
Session 3-D Asian American Literature and Political Engagement
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: Catherine Fung, Bentley University
1. “The Asian American 1960s,” Colleen Lye, University of California, Berkeley
2. “The Politics of Reading and Interpreting Asian American Literature,” Jennifer Ho, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
3. “Ideology of the American Dream in Gish Jen’s World and Town,” Matthew Ong, University of Notre Dame
4. “Politicizing the Speculative Turn: Larissa Lai’s Salt Fish Girl and the Queer Sex Worker,” Christopher Patterson, University of Washington

Thursday, May 24, 2012, 3:00 – 4:20 pm
Session 5-A Afro-Asian Connections II: Korean-African American Mixing and Melding
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies and the African American Literature and Culture Society

Chair: James Braxton Peterson, Lehigh University
1. “Langston Hughes’ Minoritarian Analogy in Afro-Korean Literary Networks,” Jang Wook Huh, Columbia University
2. “Competing Claims for Racial Justice in Anna Deveare Smith’s Twilight Los Angeles, 1992,” Heidi Bollinger, James Madison University
3. “From Soul to Seoul: Kimchee Chronicles, Transracial Adoption and the Culinary Quest for Identity,” Jinny Huh, University of Vermont

Friday, May 25, 2012, 11:10 am – 12:30 pm
Session 9-A Critical Intersections of Asian American and Latina/o Literature and History
Organized by The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies and the Latina/o Literature and Culture Society

Chair: Susan Thananopavarn, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
1. “Esperanza Rising and A Step from Heaven: An Interethnic, Intertextual Investigation of the Intersections of Chicana and Korean American Immigrant Narratives in Fiction for Young Readers,” Sandra Cox, Shawnee State University
2. “An Unknown Historiography of Chinese Coolies in Peru: Reading Ruthanne Lum McCunn’s God of Luck as a Transnational Slave Narrative,” Su Mee Lee. Dong-A University, Korea
3. “The Magic Other and Cross-Racial Alliances: The Multiracial Belonging of the Post-Civil Rights Nation,” Lynn Mie Itagaki, The Ohio State University, Columbus
4. “Reimagining Asian and Latino America,” Camilla Fojas, DePaul University

Friday, May 25, 2012, 12:40 –2:00 pm
Session 10-N Business Meeting: Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Saturday, May 26, 2012, 12:40 – 2:00 pm
Session 18-A Roundtable: Regions, Institutions, and Subject Positions: Teaching Asian American Literature to Multiple Audiences
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Moderator: Jane Hseu, Dominican University
1. Nina Ha, Creighton University
2. John Streamas, Washington State University
3. Wen Jin, Columbia University
4. Noelle Brada-Williams, San Jose State University
5. Cheryl Narumi Naruse, University of Hawai’i at Manoa
6. erin Khuê Ninh, University of California, Santa Barbara

Saturday, May 26, 2012, 2:10 – 3:30 pm
Session 19-B Special Session: Featured Conversation with Ryan Takemiya, founder of RAMA, a pan-Asian performance group in San Francisco
Organized by The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Moderator: Trevor Lee, City University of New York – The Graduate Center

Saturday, May 26, 2012, 3:40 – 5:00 pm
Session 20-G Featured Readings by Asian American Creative Writers: Philip Kan Gotanda, Nicky Schildkraut, and Lysley Tenorio
Organized by The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Moderator: Heidi Kim, UNC Chapel Hill
1. Philip Kan Gotanda
2. Nicky Schildkraut
3. Lysley Tenorio

CALL FOR PAPERS: American Literature Association–May 24-27, 2012

1.) Panel: “Afro-Asian Intersections in the Americas”
Joint session between the African American Literature & Culture Society and the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

We are seeking papers examining intersections, influences, and intimacies between African American culture and Asian American culture in any and all genres within American literature—with “American” being understood broadly to include not only the United States but North America and the Caribbean.

Topics and texts to be considered for this special session may include:

*WEB DuBois’s Dark Princess
*Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda
*Kerry Young’s novel Pao
*the Black Panther Party’s use of Maoist philosophy
*Yuri Kochiyama’s activist work and relationship with Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz
*the rise of Asian American dance crews
*Jim Jarmusch’s film Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
*Chinese in Mississippi
*works engaging with Leslie Bow’s theories in Partly Colored: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South
*the figure of the Chinese in Walter White’s Flight
*Anna Deveare Smith’s Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992
*Wu-Tang Clan
*Afro-Samurai (animated series)
*Korean and African American communities in Los Angeles and New York City
*the legacy of black Amerasian children
*Tiger Woods

Please send 300-word abstracts to James Peterson (jbp211@lehigh.edu) and Jennifer Ho (jho@email.unc.edu) by Saturday, January 7, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

2.) Panel: “Intersections between Asian American and Latino/a Literature and History”
Joint session between the Latino and Latina Literature and Culture Society and
the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

For this panel, we are seeking papers that examine intersections between Asian American and Latino/a literature, history, theory, and media/popular culture. Possible topics for exploration include histories of racially targeted rhetoric about immigration, from the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and its aftermath to recent debates about “illegal” immigration from Latin America. What resonances can we find between Asian American and Latino/a literary texts dealing with issues of immigration, migration, or exile? Papers could also address literary works that confront the rhetoric of national security, from the Japanese American incarceration during World War II to current or historic politics along the Mexico-U.S. border. We welcome papers that discuss literature from Asian and Latin American sites of U.S. imperialism, including the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Particular sites of literary intersection may include Karen Tei Yamashita’s Tropic of Orange, Cristina García’s Monkey Hunting, and Brian Ascalon Roley’s American Son, among others. Sites of theoretical intersection may include Mae M. Ngai’s Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America. We also invite papers that discuss your experiences teaching courses that address resonances between Asian American and Latino/a literature and history.

Please send 1-page abstracts to Susan Thananopavarn (sthan@email.unc.edu) and Eliza.RodriguezyGibson@lmu.edu) by Saturday, January 7, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

3.) Panel: “Marching Eastward: Asian American Writers and Whitman’s Legacy”
Co-sponsored by the Walt Whitman Society and the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Walt Whitman’s tremendous influence in American literature, especially poetry, has traversed some of the racial and geographical boundaries he mused about in his poems about ethnic and racial minorities around the world. This panel focuses on the Asian American literary responses to Whitman’s work. Genre and time period are open.

Brief abstract and CV to heidikim@email.unc.edu by January 7, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

4.) Panel: “Asian American Literature and Political Engagement”
Sponsored by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

In recognition of the 130th anniversary of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, the 70th anniversary of the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII, the 60th anniversary of the McCarran-Walter Act, the 30th anniversary of the murder of Vincent Chin, the 20th anniversary of the Los Angeles riots, and the decade of political shifts since 9/11, the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies seeks papers that engage with the relationship between Asian American literature and political engagement. How have Asian American writers used literature as a means to express a political statement? Have particular political movements, currents or climates impacted the kind of work that Asian American writers produce? How have Asian American writers defined the notion of the political? Topics and texts may touch upon any of the above historical milestones or any others that have impacted Asian American cultural production.

Please send a 300-word abstract to Catherine Fung (cfung@bentley.edu) by Saturday, January 7, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

5.) Roundtable: “Regions, Institutions, and Subject Positions: Teaching Asian American Literature to Multiple Audiences”
Sponsored by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

We are seeking participants for a roundtable discussion at the Annual Conference of the American Literature Association in San Francisco from May 24-27, 2012. The roundtable will address teaching Asian American literature to multiple audiences. Asian American literature is taught to a diverse audience that includes Asian Americans of different ethnicities; white students; students of color; international students; students of varying class, gender, and sexual identities and abilities; and faculty colleagues, including those with little knowledge of Asian American literature. In addition, Asian American literature is taught in institutions inside and outside of the US, different regions, public and private universities, community colleges, and institutions with different religious affiliations. We also hope participants can reflect on their own subject positions and how these may affect their teaching of and reception by varied audiences in specific contexts. Given the relative lack of published materials on teaching Asian American literature, we hope this roundtable provides support for those who teach Asian American literature and illuminates both practical and theoretical concerns. The roundtable will be 120 minutes in total, with 8 minutes of remarks by five participants followed by 40 minutes of discussion.

If you are interested in participating in this roundtable, please email a brief description of how your remarks would address the topic of teaching Asian American literature to multiple audiences to Nina Ha at ninaha@creighton.edu and Jane Hseu at jhseu@dom.edu. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

6.) Panel: “Asian American Theatre: ‘Hitherto Unheard and Unsung World’”
Sponsored by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

From Frank Chin’s Chickencoop Chinaman to David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly, from Wakako Yamauchi’s 12-1-A to Philip Kan Gotanda’s Yankee Dawg You Die, Asian Americans have continually used the stage as a site of remembrance and revolution. As Karen Shimakawa comments, Asian American theatrical works “attempt to engage with that uncanny strangeness [of national abjection] through a variety of strategies, all of which produce Asian Americanness as a negotiation between the poles of abject visibility/stereotype/foreigner and invisibility/assimilation (to whiteness).” With the East-West Players on the West Coast and the Pan-Asian Repertory Theatre on the East Coast, we indeed see how communities have formed in resistance to the systematic exclusion of Asian American from public representation, and they have thereby created a means of preserving and propagating an art form that speaks from a space of abjection. Still, what is it that theatre can do for the Asian American community that other literary genres cannot do? What specific strategies are used in theatre to engage with issues of identity and social displacement?

The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies (CAALS) invites papers that address issues related to Asian American theatre. Possible topics relating to Asian American theatre might include (but are not limited to): racial performance, representation, and/or passing, poetics and critical theories of the stage, nationalism/transnationalism/globalization/diaspora, typecasting/yellowface, body politics, national memory and/or imagination.

Please send a 1-page abstract and CV by email to Trevor Lee at tjlee101@gmail.com by January 10, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.