CAALS schedule for ALA 2016

Please join us in San Francisco for the following CAALS panel and business meeting. The meeting is an opportunity to meet fellow scholars in a collegial environment and discuss possible panels for next year, and to get involved in CAALS leadership!

Thursday, May 26, 2016, 1:30–2:50pm
Session 4-A – Asian American Literary Studies: 34 Years of Critical History (Pacific I) Organized by Circle for Asian American Literary Studies
Chair: Lynn Mie Itagaki, The Ohio State University

  1. “Asian American Studies: Representations of Educated Women Changing the Canon,” Krupal Amin, The Ohio State University
  2. “Mapping Trauma in the Asian Diasporic Imagination,” Jinah Kim, California State University, Northridge
  3. “Literature, History, and the Cold War in Paul Yoon’s Snow Hunters,” Jeehyun Lim, Denison University
  4. “Biography I Have None: José Garcia Villa and the Anachronism of Early Asian American Literature,” Swati Rana, University of California, Santa Barbara

Thursday, May 26, 2016, 4:30–5:50pm
Session 6-A – Critical Perspectives on Karen Tei Yamashita (Seacliff C/D) Organized by Circle for Asian American Literary Studies
Chair: Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, University of Maryland

  1. “I Hotel: A Narrative Form for Imagining Panethnic Coalition,” Long Le-Khac, Washington University in St. Louis
  2. “Memory and Choreography in Karen Tei Yamashita’s ‘Dance’ in I Hotel,” Sean Labrador y Manzano, independent scholar
  3. “Historicizing Critique: Karen Tei Yamashita’s Tropic of Orange and the Changing Field of Production under Globalization,” Rei Magosaki, Chapman University
  4. “The Contingencies of Comparative Racialization: Karen Tei Yamashita’s I Hotel and the Racial Pyramid,” Lynn Mie Itagaki, The Ohio State University

Thursday, May 26, 2016, 6:00–6:50pm
Featured Reading by Karen Tei Yamashita (Seacliff C/D)

Friday, May 27, 2016, 9:40–11:00am
Session 8-A – Histories of Becoming in Asian American Literary Studies (Pacific I) Organized by Circle for Asian American Literary Studies
Chair: Sean Labrador y Manzano, independent scholar

  1. “Constructions of the Lyric ‘I’ in the Poetry of the Japanese American Internment,” Christine Kitano, Ithaca College
  2. “Chinese American Literature in the Twenty-First Century: Writing China in Yiyun Li’s Gold Boy, Emerald Girl,” Walter S. H. Lim, National University of Singapore
  3. “Reading Transnationalism in Asian American Literature: Contradictions of Modernity in the Work of Carlos Bulosan,” Mark Chiang, University of Illinois at Chicago

Friday, May 27, 2016, 11:10am–12:30pm

Session 9-A – #Asians4BlackLives: Protest and Solidarity in Asian American Literature (Pacific F)

Organized by Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Organizers and Co-Chairs: Sharon Tang-Quan, independent scholar; and Caroline Kyungah Hong, Queens College, City University of New York (CUNY)

  1. “The Angst of Triangulation: Blackness & Asian American Agony in the Theater of Philip Kan Gotanda,” Takeo Rivera, University of California, Berkeley
  2. “Protesting for Survival: Queerness/ Interracial Romance/ Hunting in Nina Revoyr’s Wingshooters,” Stephen Hong Sohn, University of California, Riverside
  3. “Black and Asian Solidarity in The Philippine-America War,” Chris Santiago, University of St. Thomas
  4. “Nandito Ako, I am here: A love song to America,” Bonnie Wailee Kwong, Artist in Residence, Stanford University

Friday, May 27, 2016, 2:10–3:30pm

Session 11-P – Business Meeting: Circle for Asian American Literary Studies (Bay Level: Marina Room)

Friday, May 27, 2016, 3:40–5:00pm
Session 12-K – Yellowface: Performing and Occupying the Mind, Body, and Space in Asian American Literature (Bay Level: Seacliff A) Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies Chair: Sean Labrador y Manzano, independent scholar

  1. “Yellowface: Performing and Occupying the Mind, Body, and Space in Asian American literature,” Geneva Chao, LBCC
  2. “In/Through the Line: Avant-Garde Intersections of Marginalization and the Lyric,” Mg Roberts, Kelsey Street Press
  3. “Considering Race and Appropriation in Poetics Today,” Margaret Rhee, University of Oregon