Announcing the inaugural CAALS Essay Prize

CAALS ESSAY PRIZE
Due Date: May 9, 2014

Starting this year, CAALS will be launching an annual book prize for the best paper on Asian American literary studies written by a graduate student/doctoral candidate (or, should the occasion arise, an undergraduate student) and presented at any ALA panel. Papers must be submitted electronically by May 9, 2014. Papers will be read and evaluated by a committee drawn from the CAALS leadership and membership. The winner will be notified before the ALA and will be the guest of honor at the annual CAALS dinner at the conference. Submissions and inquiries should be sent to caalsweb@gmail.com.

CFP for ALA 2014!

CALLS FOR PAPERS for the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies panels at ALA 2014 in Washington, D.C.! Please consult the ALA conference website for more information on the conference fees, site, and other logistics. Also, note that the required CAALS membership for participation in CAALS panels is separate from the ALA conference fee.
__________________________

25th Annual ALA Conference
May 22 – 25, 2014
Hyatt Regency Washington
on Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue NW
Washington D.C., 20001
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1) Critical Perspectives on Ruth Ozeki
Chair: Sue J. Kim, University of Massachusetts Lowell
Due Date: January 10, 2014

The work of mixed-race Japanese American Ruth Ozeki has been praised as consistently and uniquely smart, formally inventive, funny, compassionate, and beautiful. Ozeki’s three novels include My Year of Meats (1998); All Over Creation (2002), winner of the 2004 American Book Award from Before Columbus Foundation; and A Tale For the Time Being (2013), long-listed for the Man Booker Prize. She has also authored a number of shorter fiction pieces, and her films include Body of Correspondence (1994), winner of the New Visions Awards at the San Francisco Film Festival, and the neo-documentary Halving the Bones. While each of her texts are quite different, a number of central concerns thread through them: mixed race(s), the body and embodiment, food and the environment (in the context of corporate agribusiness), Zen Buddhism, memory and time, unexpected transnational circuits, and the myriad challenges to “living more consciously” (the title of a workshop Ozeki has conducted).

This panel seeks to highlight new critical work on Ozeki’s oeuvre; proposals on any of Ozeki’s fiction and/or films are welcome.

Send 300-word abstract and two-page CV by email to Sue J. Kim (sue_kim@uml.edu) by January 10, 2014.

2) Human Rights and Asian American Literary Studies
Chair: Lynn Itagaki, The Ohio State University
Due Date: January 15, 2014

Historically, Asian immigrants came to the United States seeking economic opportunity, political security, as well as social stability, whether they were seafarers, California gold rush miners, paper sons, picture brides, post-1965 migrants, refugees, asylum seekers, or even transnational elites. This panel solicits paper proposals to broadly consider the following questions: How does a human rights framework produce new interpretations of Asian American literature? How does the consideration of Asian Americans and Asian diasporic communities broaden concepts of global human rights?
Alongside the theoretical interests in biopolitics, precarity and vulnerability, the question of human rights has developed into an increasingly popular framework through which to analyze injustice and inequality. As the forces of global capitalism and neoliberalism have increasingly eroded the rights and protections accorded to individuals by nation-states, human rights have become more anxiously promoted to protect populations within and across international borders. Asian diasporic histories are intertwined with human suffering and crimes against humanity caused by the forced migration and displacement of peoples, Cold War imperialism, genocide, totalitarian regimes and civil wars. This panel invites considerations of a wide range of Asian American texts such as fiction, poetry, film, journalism, memoir, or activist writing, and encourages intersections with critical ethnic studies, feminist studies, queer studies, disability studies, and environmental studies.
Please email a 350-500 word abstract of your paper to Lynn Itagaki at itagaki.5@osu.edu by January 15, 2014. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract.

3) Asian American Literary Pedagogy Roundtable
Chair: Heidi Kim, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Due Date: January 15, 2014

CAALS seeks participants for a roundtable focused on new challenges/methodologies in Asian American literary pedagogy. All topics/approaches within this general topic are welcome. Please send a brief abstract and CV to heidikim@email.unc.edu by January 15, 2014.

Prageeta Sharma

A short excerpt of Prageeta Sharma (poet and professor at the University of Montana) reading from her new collection, Undergloom. (Warning: The volume is very, very low.)

 

 

ALA 2013 Photos

CAALS had well-attended panels, a roundtable, and an author reading at ALA 2013 (Boston). Below are some photos from the highly successful Geographies of Asian America double panel. Thanks to everyone for participating!

Geographies of Asian America I. Left to right: Chris Eng, Lynne Horiuchi, Jeehyun Lim (chair), Lynn Itagaki. Not pictured: Belinda Kong.

Left to right: Chris Eng, Lynne Horiuchi, Jeehyun Lim (chair), Lynn Itagaki. Not pictured: Belinda Kong.

Geographies of Asian America II. Left to right: Susan Thananopavarn, Alaina Kaus, Rajender Kaur, Trevor Lee. Not pictured: Ruth Lahti.

Geographies of Asian America II. Left to right: Susan Thananopavarn, Alaina Kaus, Rajender Kaur, Trevor Lee (chair). Not pictured: Ruth Lahti.

 

Panels for ALA 2013, Boston

From the draft program.

Friday, May 24, 2013, 12:40–2:00
Session 10-E Humanities Under Attack: Roundtable on Teaching Asian American Literature (St George D 3rd Floor)
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: Lynn Itagaki, The Ohio State University
1. Betsy Huang, Clark University
2. Jinah Kim, Northwestern University
3. Ju Yon Kim, Harvard University
4. Min Song, Boston College
5. Jean Wu, Tufts University
6. Weihua Zhang, Savannah College of Art and Design

Friday, May 24, 2013, 2:10–3:30
Session 11-O Business Meeting: Circle for Asian American Literary Studies (Baltic 7th Floor)

Friday, May 24, 2013, 5:10-6:30 pm
Session 13-I Author Reading (Adams 7th Floor)
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: Heidi Kim, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
1. Prageeta Sharma
2. Rahna Reiko Rizzuto

Saturday, May 25, 2013, 8:00-9:20 am
Session 14-I Geographies of Asian America I: Imperialist Production of Asian/American Space at Home and Abroad (Adams 7th Floor)
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: Jeehyun Lim, Denison University
1. “The Mapping of Everyday Life in Japanese American ‘Relocation Centers’: Mine Okubo’s Map of the City of Topaz,” Lynne Horiuchi, University of California, Berkeley
2. “Asian Americanist Camps: Mapping the Trans/national Spaces of US Empire in Chay Yew’s ‘A Beautiful Country,’” Chris A. Eng, City University of New York
3. “The Rights of Suffering, The Wrongs of Remembrance for the Forgotten War in Toni Morrison’s Home and Chang-rae Lee’s The Surrendered,” Lynn M. Itagaki, The Ohio State University
4. “’American Asia’ in Ha Jin’s Nanjing Requiem: Asian American Literary Politics as Comparative Empire Studies,” Belinda Kong, Bowdoin College

Saturday, May 25, 2013, 9:30-10:50am
Session 15-M Geographies of Asian America II: The Local and the Global in Asian American Literature (Adams 7th Floor)
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: Trevor Lee, City University of New York
1. “Mapping the Forgotten Geography of Early South Asian America,” Rajender Kaur, William Paterson University
2. “How Ghostly Renderings Shatter: Challenging Southern Histories of Asian America in Monique Truong’s Bitter in the Mouth,” Alaina Kaus, University of Connecticut
3. “Text, Context, and Hypercontext: Globalized Spaces in Karen Tei Yamashita’s Tropic of Orange,” Susan Thananopavarn, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
4. “Chang-rae Lee’s The Surrendered and the Geographies of ‘Inter-Imperiality,’” Ruth A. H. Lahti, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Saturday, May 25, 2013, 2:00-3:20 pm
Session 18-F Contextualizing Complicity: Political and Social Disparities in Asian American Literature (Adams 7th Floor)
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: Heidi Kim, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
1. “Reading ‘Dreams from My Father’ as a Text of Transnational ‘Middleman’ Power,” Mijeong Park, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh
2. “Between Settlers and Sovereignty: The Asian Laborer in Native Hawaiian Protest Literature,” Trevor Lee, City University of New York
3. “Intern(ment)alized Imperialisms: Asian Americans in the US Military,” Robert Oscar Lopez, California State University, Northridge

CALL FOR PAPERS: American Literature Association–May 23-26, 2013

CALLS FOR PAPERS for the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies panels at ALA 2013 in Boston! Please consult the ALA website for more information on the conference fees, site, and other logistics. Please note that the required CAALS membership for participation in CAALS panels is separate from the ALA conference fee.

1) Geographies of Asian America

The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies invites submissions for two panels that reflect on the development and state of Asian American literature through the “geographies” of Asian America with an eye to regional differences and the transnational turn.

While the West Coast and Hawaii have long occupied a central place in Asian American literature due to their closeness to the Asia Pacific and the high concentration of Asian Americans in these regions, new sensibilities of Asian American places can also be seen in post-1965 Asian American literature. Gish Jen, Chang-rae Lee, and Jhumpa Lahiri, for example, embed the variegated lives of Asian Americans in urban centers and suburban neighborhoods on the East Coast in their work. Scholarship such as Leslie Bow’s recent book, Partly Colored: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South, uncovers the story of the previously overlooked Asian American South.

Recent emphasis on transnationalism and diaspora in Asian American Studies also prompts us to think of the geographies of Asian America beyond the territorial boundaries of the nation-state. For example, Chang-rae Lee’s A Gesture Life is set in a suburban neighborhood in upstate New York; yet half the novel shows the wartime Pacific in flashbacks. More recent fiction that contain narratives of American-born Asians returning to the country of origin, such as Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake or Aimee Phan’s The Reeducation of Cherry Truong, likewise ask us to reexamine our assumptions of space and place as it pertains to Asian America.

How does Asian American literature create Asian American geographies in the U.S. and abroad? We invite papers on any aspect of the question. Email abstracts of 200-250 words to jeehyun.lim@gmail.com by January 15. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/

2) Humanities Under Attack: Teaching Asian American Literature

We are seeking participants for a roundtable discussion at the Annual Conference of the American Literature Association in Boston from May 23-26, 2013. The roundtable will address teaching Asian American literature in the current environment in which humanities are under attack. The state of Florida has proposed charging students more tuition for humanities majors, classifying them as “non-strategic,” non-productive disciplines. Programs and departments that focus on women, gender, sexuality, and racial groups are the first to experience funding cuts, budgeting freezes, no new hiring, or rejection for their creation; the global financial crisis dramatically reduced already historically low state funding for education and private endowments. How do we teach Asian American literature and studies in a way that matters? How do we make what we do and teach visible to skeptical administrators, university regents, voters, and funding sources? What kind of goals and learning outcomes do we have for our students in Asian American literature classes and how do we revise them in this anti-humanities educational environment? We welcome participants to think theoretically and historically as well as more specifically on their own experiences and conditions at their institutions. The roundtable will feature 7 minutes of remarks by five participants followed by 40 minutes of discussion.

If you are interested in participating in this roundtable, please email a brief 150-200 word description of how your remarks would address the topic of teaching Asian American literature to Lynn Itagaki at itagaki.5@osu.edu by January 15. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

Panels for ALA 2012, San Francisco

(From the draft program.)

Thursday, May 24, 2012, 9:00 – 10:20 am
Session 1-A Afro-Asian Connections I: 20th C. Intersections among African-American and Asian Americans
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies and the African American Literature and Culture Society

Chair: Jennifer Ho, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
1. “Annexation in the Pacific and Asian Conspiracy in Central America in James Weldon Johnson’s Libretti for “Toloso” and “El Presidente, or the Yellow Peril,” John Gruesser, Kean University
2. “Jim and Jap Crow in 1940s Chicago,” Matthew Briones, University of Chicago
3. “A Tale of Two Obits: Reading the Cold War through the Obituaries of W.E.B. DuBois and Chairman Mao Tsetung,” Vera Leigh Fennell, Lehigh University
4. “‘We Didn’t Speak No English, and He Didn’t Speak No Chinese’: Community, Cultural Exchange, and the Afro-Asian South in Cynthia Shearer’s The Celestial Jukebox,” Frank Cha, College of William and Mary

Thursday, May 24, 2012, 12:00 – 1:20 pm
Session 3-D Asian American Literature and Political Engagement
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: Catherine Fung, Bentley University
1. “The Asian American 1960s,” Colleen Lye, University of California, Berkeley
2. “The Politics of Reading and Interpreting Asian American Literature,” Jennifer Ho, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
3. “Ideology of the American Dream in Gish Jen’s World and Town,” Matthew Ong, University of Notre Dame
4. “Politicizing the Speculative Turn: Larissa Lai’s Salt Fish Girl and the Queer Sex Worker,” Christopher Patterson, University of Washington

Thursday, May 24, 2012, 3:00 – 4:20 pm
Session 5-A Afro-Asian Connections II: Korean-African American Mixing and Melding
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies and the African American Literature and Culture Society

Chair: James Braxton Peterson, Lehigh University
1. “Langston Hughes’ Minoritarian Analogy in Afro-Korean Literary Networks,” Jang Wook Huh, Columbia University
2. “Competing Claims for Racial Justice in Anna Deveare Smith’s Twilight Los Angeles, 1992,” Heidi Bollinger, James Madison University
3. “From Soul to Seoul: Kimchee Chronicles, Transracial Adoption and the Culinary Quest for Identity,” Jinny Huh, University of Vermont

Friday, May 25, 2012, 11:10 am – 12:30 pm
Session 9-A Critical Intersections of Asian American and Latina/o Literature and History
Organized by The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies and the Latina/o Literature and Culture Society

Chair: Susan Thananopavarn, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
1. “Esperanza Rising and A Step from Heaven: An Interethnic, Intertextual Investigation of the Intersections of Chicana and Korean American Immigrant Narratives in Fiction for Young Readers,” Sandra Cox, Shawnee State University
2. “An Unknown Historiography of Chinese Coolies in Peru: Reading Ruthanne Lum McCunn’s God of Luck as a Transnational Slave Narrative,” Su Mee Lee. Dong-A University, Korea
3. “The Magic Other and Cross-Racial Alliances: The Multiracial Belonging of the Post-Civil Rights Nation,” Lynn Mie Itagaki, The Ohio State University, Columbus
4. “Reimagining Asian and Latino America,” Camilla Fojas, DePaul University

Friday, May 25, 2012, 12:40 –2:00 pm
Session 10-N Business Meeting: Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Saturday, May 26, 2012, 12:40 – 2:00 pm
Session 18-A Roundtable: Regions, Institutions, and Subject Positions: Teaching Asian American Literature to Multiple Audiences
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Moderator: Jane Hseu, Dominican University
1. Nina Ha, Creighton University
2. John Streamas, Washington State University
3. Wen Jin, Columbia University
4. Noelle Brada-Williams, San Jose State University
5. Cheryl Narumi Naruse, University of Hawai’i at Manoa
6. erin Khuê Ninh, University of California, Santa Barbara

Saturday, May 26, 2012, 2:10 – 3:30 pm
Session 19-B Special Session: Featured Conversation with Ryan Takemiya, founder of RAMA, a pan-Asian performance group in San Francisco
Organized by The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Moderator: Trevor Lee, City University of New York – The Graduate Center

Saturday, May 26, 2012, 3:40 – 5:00 pm
Session 20-G Featured Readings by Asian American Creative Writers: Philip Kan Gotanda, Nicky Schildkraut, and Lysley Tenorio
Organized by The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Moderator: Heidi Kim, UNC Chapel Hill
1. Philip Kan Gotanda
2. Nicky Schildkraut
3. Lysley Tenorio

CALL FOR PAPERS: American Literature Association–May 24-27, 2012

1.) Panel: “Afro-Asian Intersections in the Americas”
Joint session between the African American Literature & Culture Society and the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

We are seeking papers examining intersections, influences, and intimacies between African American culture and Asian American culture in any and all genres within American literature—with “American” being understood broadly to include not only the United States but North America and the Caribbean.

Topics and texts to be considered for this special session may include:

*WEB DuBois’s Dark Princess
*Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda
*Kerry Young’s novel Pao
*the Black Panther Party’s use of Maoist philosophy
*Yuri Kochiyama’s activist work and relationship with Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz
*the rise of Asian American dance crews
*Jim Jarmusch’s film Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai
*Chinese in Mississippi
*works engaging with Leslie Bow’s theories in Partly Colored: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South
*the figure of the Chinese in Walter White’s Flight
*Anna Deveare Smith’s Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992
*Wu-Tang Clan
*Afro-Samurai (animated series)
*Korean and African American communities in Los Angeles and New York City
*the legacy of black Amerasian children
*Tiger Woods

Please send 300-word abstracts to James Peterson (jbp211@lehigh.edu) and Jennifer Ho (jho@email.unc.edu) by Saturday, January 7, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

2.) Panel: “Intersections between Asian American and Latino/a Literature and History”
Joint session between the Latino and Latina Literature and Culture Society and
the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

For this panel, we are seeking papers that examine intersections between Asian American and Latino/a literature, history, theory, and media/popular culture. Possible topics for exploration include histories of racially targeted rhetoric about immigration, from the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and its aftermath to recent debates about “illegal” immigration from Latin America. What resonances can we find between Asian American and Latino/a literary texts dealing with issues of immigration, migration, or exile? Papers could also address literary works that confront the rhetoric of national security, from the Japanese American incarceration during World War II to current or historic politics along the Mexico-U.S. border. We welcome papers that discuss literature from Asian and Latin American sites of U.S. imperialism, including the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Particular sites of literary intersection may include Karen Tei Yamashita’s Tropic of Orange, Cristina García’s Monkey Hunting, and Brian Ascalon Roley’s American Son, among others. Sites of theoretical intersection may include Mae M. Ngai’s Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America. We also invite papers that discuss your experiences teaching courses that address resonances between Asian American and Latino/a literature and history.

Please send 1-page abstracts to Susan Thananopavarn (sthan@email.unc.edu) and Eliza.RodriguezyGibson@lmu.edu) by Saturday, January 7, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

3.) Panel: “Marching Eastward: Asian American Writers and Whitman’s Legacy”
Co-sponsored by the Walt Whitman Society and the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Walt Whitman’s tremendous influence in American literature, especially poetry, has traversed some of the racial and geographical boundaries he mused about in his poems about ethnic and racial minorities around the world. This panel focuses on the Asian American literary responses to Whitman’s work. Genre and time period are open.

Brief abstract and CV to heidikim@email.unc.edu by January 7, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

4.) Panel: “Asian American Literature and Political Engagement”
Sponsored by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

In recognition of the 130th anniversary of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, the 70th anniversary of the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII, the 60th anniversary of the McCarran-Walter Act, the 30th anniversary of the murder of Vincent Chin, the 20th anniversary of the Los Angeles riots, and the decade of political shifts since 9/11, the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies seeks papers that engage with the relationship between Asian American literature and political engagement. How have Asian American writers used literature as a means to express a political statement? Have particular political movements, currents or climates impacted the kind of work that Asian American writers produce? How have Asian American writers defined the notion of the political? Topics and texts may touch upon any of the above historical milestones or any others that have impacted Asian American cultural production.

Please send a 300-word abstract to Catherine Fung (cfung@bentley.edu) by Saturday, January 7, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

5.) Roundtable: “Regions, Institutions, and Subject Positions: Teaching Asian American Literature to Multiple Audiences”
Sponsored by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

We are seeking participants for a roundtable discussion at the Annual Conference of the American Literature Association in San Francisco from May 24-27, 2012. The roundtable will address teaching Asian American literature to multiple audiences. Asian American literature is taught to a diverse audience that includes Asian Americans of different ethnicities; white students; students of color; international students; students of varying class, gender, and sexual identities and abilities; and faculty colleagues, including those with little knowledge of Asian American literature. In addition, Asian American literature is taught in institutions inside and outside of the US, different regions, public and private universities, community colleges, and institutions with different religious affiliations. We also hope participants can reflect on their own subject positions and how these may affect their teaching of and reception by varied audiences in specific contexts. Given the relative lack of published materials on teaching Asian American literature, we hope this roundtable provides support for those who teach Asian American literature and illuminates both practical and theoretical concerns. The roundtable will be 120 minutes in total, with 8 minutes of remarks by five participants followed by 40 minutes of discussion.

If you are interested in participating in this roundtable, please email a brief description of how your remarks would address the topic of teaching Asian American literature to multiple audiences to Nina Ha at ninaha@creighton.edu and Jane Hseu at jhseu@dom.edu. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

6.) Panel: “Asian American Theatre: ‘Hitherto Unheard and Unsung World’”
Sponsored by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

From Frank Chin’s Chickencoop Chinaman to David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly, from Wakako Yamauchi’s 12-1-A to Philip Kan Gotanda’s Yankee Dawg You Die, Asian Americans have continually used the stage as a site of remembrance and revolution. As Karen Shimakawa comments, Asian American theatrical works “attempt to engage with that uncanny strangeness [of national abjection] through a variety of strategies, all of which produce Asian Americanness as a negotiation between the poles of abject visibility/stereotype/foreigner and invisibility/assimilation (to whiteness).” With the East-West Players on the West Coast and the Pan-Asian Repertory Theatre on the East Coast, we indeed see how communities have formed in resistance to the systematic exclusion of Asian American from public representation, and they have thereby created a means of preserving and propagating an art form that speaks from a space of abjection. Still, what is it that theatre can do for the Asian American community that other literary genres cannot do? What specific strategies are used in theatre to engage with issues of identity and social displacement?

The Circle for Asian American Literary Studies (CAALS) invites papers that address issues related to Asian American theatre. Possible topics relating to Asian American theatre might include (but are not limited to): racial performance, representation, and/or passing, poetics and critical theories of the stage, nationalism/transnationalism/globalization/diaspora, typecasting/yellowface, body politics, national memory and/or imagination.

Please send a 1-page abstract and CV by email to Trevor Lee at tjlee101@gmail.com by January 10, 2012. Be sure to mention any technological needs for your presentation on your abstract. Also, please note that if your abstract is selected and you agree to present on this panel, you will need to become a member of CAALS before presenting. For more information, please visit our website at http://caals.org/.

ALA 2011 PANELS (BOSTON, MAY 26-29)

(From draft program.)

Thursday, May 26, 3:00-4:20 pm
Session 5-I Aliens and Allies: A Roundtable on Latina/o and Asian American Literary Studies in Contemporary American Politics
Organized by the Latina/o Literature and Culture Society and the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Moderator: Catherine Fung, Bentley University

1. Sharada Balachandran-Orihuela, University of California, Davis
2. Amy Parziale, University of Arizona
3. Eliza Rodriguez y Gibson, Loyola Marymount University
4. Lou Caton, Westfield State University
5. Jane Hsieu, Dominican University

Friday, May 27, 12:40-2:00 pm
Session 10-C Pedagogy Roundtable: Asian American Studies, Literacy, and Education
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Moderator: Greta Ai-yu Niu, University of Rochester

Participants:
Rocío Davis, City University of Hong Kong
Jennifer Ho, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Betsy Huang, Clark University
Stephanie Li, University of Rochester
Timothy Yu, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Friday, May 27, 5:10-6:30 pm
Session 14-C Comparative Ethnic Religion in a Postsecular World
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies and the Latino/a Literature and Culture Society

Chair: Timothy Yu, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1. “Audacity to Hope: Barack Obama and the Spiritual Vernacular,” Anton Williams, Loyola Marymount University
2. “Chang-Rae Lee‘s Native Speaker: Shall We Teach Tolerance and Assimilation as Spiritual Values in Asian American Literary Studies?,” Lou Caton, Westfield State University
3. “Born a Heathen: Hisaye Yamamoto, Incarceration and the Catholic Worker,” Khanh Ho, Grinnell College

Saturday, May 28, 11:00 am – 12:20 PM
Session 17-K Techno-Orientalism and Asian American Culture
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: David Roh, Old Dominion University

1. “Nature, the City, and Techno-Orientalism in the Works of William Gibson,” Julie Ha Tran, University of California, Davis
2. “Love and Loathing in the Digital Age: Contemporary Speculative Fiction and the New Yellow Peril,” Betsy Huang, Clark University
3. “Video Games and Virtual Empire: Asian Pacific America in The Guild,” Greta Ai-yu Niu, University of Rochester
4. “‘Don’t Worry, We’ll Find Them’: Race Passing and Detection in Battlestar Galactica,” Jinny Huh, University of Vermont

Saturday, May 28, 3:30-4:50 pm
Session 20-F New Perspectives on the Works of Meena Alexander
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Chair: Nicky Schildkraut, University of Southern California

1. “Home Ground and Borderlands,” Meena Alexander, City University of New York – The Graduate Center and Hunter College
2. “Meena Alexander: ‘Dislocation? The Place is the United States,’” Stephanie Han, City University of Hong Kong
3. “‘What if crossing a border one changed color, shape even?’: Momentum and Metamorphosis in Meena Alexander’s Poetry,” Trevor Lee, City University of New York – The Graduate Center
4. “Location and Dislocation of a Fragmented-Self: Meena Alexander‘s Writings within a Diasporic Space,” Divya Girishkumar, Cardiff University

Saturday, May 28, 5:00 – 6:20 pm
Session 21-B Contemporary South Asian Poetry: A Reading of Poetry Featuring Meena Alexander
Organized by the Circle for Asian American Literary Studies

Poet and novelist Meena Alexander, Distinguished Professor of English at the City University of New York, will read poetry selections from her book Quickly Changing River. Poet Bushra Rehman will also read from her work.

CFP: JNT special issue “Historicizing Narrative Theory” – July 15, 2011

The Journal of Narrative Theory (JNT) seeks submissions for an upcoming special issue, “Historicizing Narrative Theory.”

Essays (max. 10,000 words) should address themselves to the relationship(s) of contemporary narrative theory to ethnic and/or postcolonial studies, and may examine both literary and cultural texts (visual and digital mediums, music, ethnographies, tourism guides, etc).

Structuralist, or classical, narrative theory – in the vein of Roland Barthes, Gerard Genette, and Tzvetan Todorov – sought to articulate a taxonomy of narrative, taking as its principle examples canonical texts of European and American literature, e.g. Genette on Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past. While feminist narrative theorists, such as Susan Lanser and Robyn Warhol, have demonstrated that gender and sexuality are constitutive considerations of texts, rather than simply extra-formal considerations, similar theoretical engagements with narrative theory in terms of race, capital, imperialism, and class still need to take place. Narrative theory remains only partly decolonized despite the increasing globalization of the contemporary novel, in form and content as well as production, distribution, and consumption. We know that race, nation, and class matter to literary form, but how and why do we account for it in narrative theory? And how does narrative theory have to change/reconsider itself in order to truly decolonize?

What would a “postcolonial” or “marxist” narratology look like? Is an “ethnic,” “postcolonial,” or “marxist” narrative theory even possible or desirable? What are the dangers/pitfalls of ghettoization and/or co-optation in engaging classical narrative theory? What kinds of questions does narrative theory need to ask in order to be historicized? For example, Dan Shen, Ming Dong Gu, and others have sought to articulate Chinese narrative theory that takes into account both specific Chinese aesthetic and cultural histories as well as considers mutual artistic and theoretical influences with the West. In his work on Latino comics and postcolonial writing, Frederick Luis Aldama argues for the universality of not only the narrative tools available to writers and graphic novelists, but also the very cognitive processes that inform our subjectivity and creativity. Michael McKeon’s 2000 anthology, Theory of the Novel: A Historical Approach, treats narrative historically but focuses only on fiction and includes only three essays on postcolonial writing.

We are looking for essays that engage with the limitations/possibilities of current narrative theory(s), either through explicit theoretical engagement with narrative theory and/or the practice/revisiting of it through innovative interpretations of texts.

Information about the journal can be found at the following address:

Contributors should follow the MLA style (7th edition), with footnotes kept at a minimum and incorporated into the text where possible.

Please send a copy of the submission by email attachment to each of the editors – Sue J. Kim (skim666@gmail.com) and Priyamvada Gopal (pg268@cam.ac.uk) – by July 15, 2011.

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